Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Open Letter to the Conscience of Humanity

Roger Tucker
Editor and Publisher, One Democratic State

It is only right and fitting that a proper response be made to the OpEd written by Moshe Feiglin, Deputy Speaker of the Knesset, and head of the Manhigut Yehudit ("Jewish Leadership") faction of Israel’s governing Likud party, entitled My Outline for a Solution in Gaza and published in Arutz Sheva on July 15th, 2014.
1. An international commission should be established to bring Israel and its supporters to account for its ongoing genocide of the Palestinian people, dating back to the first terrorist attacks on Palestinian and British targets in Palestine by the Irgun and other Jewish terrorist organizations starting in 1937. This near century long crime can properly be termed a holocaust, as its ruthlessness, intensity, longevity and destruction of lives and property is on a par with, or exceeds, the crimes of those prosecuted by the Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes trials.
2. The first task of this commission would be to identify the most culpable of the Zionist criminals still living, not to exceed one thousand people. Millions are guilty but bringing those most responsible for the suffering of the Palestinians, the Lebanese, the Iraqis, the Libyans, the Iranians, the Egyptians, the Syrians et al and the many millions of other direct and indirect victims of the Zionist project, would best serve the cause of justice.
3. Those people so identified should be drawn from the various sectors of society that have been primarily responsible for the heinous war crimes and crimes against humanity committed over these years, regardless of their countries of residence, particularly among the politicians, the major corporations, the military, the media, the financiers, the public intellectuals, academics, the religious leaders and the leaders of Zionist organizations. Those found guilty would be sentenced to a minimum of life in solitary confinement without parole.
4. In addition to those specifically indicted, all of those people who have actively provided material, organizational or public support for this genocide should be rounded up and interned in camps designated for this purpose. Given the very large numbers of such people, the FEMA camps in the United States would be suitable for this purpose. An alternative site could be constructed in the Siberian Oblast set aside by the Soviet Union for the Jewish people. An appeals process would be instituted to ensure that only the clearly culpable would remain in these camps. Those adjudged guilty would be consigned to hard labor and re-education designed to eventually make them suitable for re-entry into human society, if that is at all possible.
5. Given the impotence of the United Nations, due to the veto power and influence of those countries that have historically aided and abetted the aforesaid crimes, such a commission could not be instituted through its auspices. The UN must first either be reformed to make it a truly representational international body, or it must be replaced by a new organization that represents the highest norms and values of humanity, rather than merely an instrument of control by the victors of the last world war. The International Criminal Court would be the ideal venue, if the jurisdictional problems (the US and Israel are not signatories) and the political will can be mustered.
6. The greatest obstacle to the realization of such a process is the current tribal Jewish hegemony over the Western democracies and their allies in the Arab world. But there is nothing absolute about this power. Many Jews, not to mention others, are beginning to understand the fate that will inevitably befall them if they don't join the struggle against Zionism and its lackeys. The historical pattern is perfectly clear.
7. Finally, it goes without saying that Palestine would be returned to its rightful owners.
(This piece has been carried here from the author's site One Democratic State  in solidarity.)

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