Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Letter of solidarity to the doctors in Gaza and condemnation of the assault on hospitals and civilians by Israeli Defense Force



To be submitted to the Embassy of Israel, Kathmandu, Nepal


This is to express our solidarity to the fellow doctors working under extremely challenging and even life-threatening conditions across the Gaza strip. 

While we strongly denounce any form of violence from either side, we are particularly worried by the unfathomable degree of ruthlessness shown by the Israeli military on bombarding the civilian targets in Gaza including the schools and hospitals. While a loss of life at any site and condition is regrettable, it is doubly so when people get killed in hospitals where they are supposed to get safety and treatment.

We have highest appreciation for our colleagues in Gaza who are defying such horrible work conditions to save lives of people at the moment of crisis. As there is little material help that we can offer from Nepal, we are expressing our moral support and solidarity towards their extraordinary work.

Regardless of our political persuasions and our individual views regarding the particular conflict, we urge both the sides to end the violence at once on humanitarian grounds if not anything else. Even if that is not possible, we strongly demand that the Israeli military avoid repeating the senseless and shameful acts of shelling the hospitals. 

Whatever the outcome of the current conflict, we firmly believe that the indiscriminate killing of civilians in hospital or elsewhere only shows the contempt of the guilty side to the whole cause of humanity. 

As all human lives are sacred and we value all of them equally, we demand the international community to impartially investigate the acts committed during this conflict that contravene the international agreements and accords related to war. That will go a long way towards dissuading any future aggressor from resorting to such dastardly acts thereby saving lives of the civilians. It is our sincere belief that only an unbiased international system that holds the guilty sides accountable can ensure that no civilians lose their lives for no fault of theirs. 




Signees of the letter:
Dr. Jiwan Kshetry  Dr. Madhur Basnet, Dr Deebya Raj Mishra, Dr. Aayush Khanal,  Dr. Jagadeesh Chandra Bist, Dr.  Bikash Gauchan, Dr. Santosh Kumar Dhungana, Dr.  Niraj Shrestha, Dr.  Bishnu Pokharel, Dr. Surya Prasad Rimal, Dr. Rakshya Parajuli, Dr. Aayusha Gautam, Dr. Santosh Basnet, Dr. Santosh Maskey

--on behalf of Nepal's medical fraternity.

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