Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Urgent letter to NMC office-bearers


Dear Nepal Medical Council office-bearers

Out of respect and concern for you, I am writing this short letter. 

Before electing you and even now, we presume that you are ordinary human beings with normal sense of shame and honor. Based on your pre-poll commitments, we also presume you to be better than the other contenders of the posts.

Despite all the evidence in the past, we have not hurriedly concluded that the present team is as shamelessly corrupt and brazenly selfish as ever. So we still do have hopes pinned on you. 


Also, without any concrete evidence, we are not going to say some or all of you have been already bribed by the mafia running the private medical colleges in Nepal. We are not so sure if that will hold true for the future but by no means it is a lost case. And some or most or all of you have the chance to listen to your conscience and perform the real job you are supposed to do.

But there is limit of patience. The messages that you sent thanking us for voting you in the recent elections are still saved in our inboxes. Yet you are surprisingly missing from the scene when there is need and other people have to write about your positions. 

Please realize that you are a medico, after all, before you are a NMC member. And doctors were the people who elected you. 


But I do not feel like complaining about you not behaving like a doctor. What really hurts is the fact that many in the fraternity now believe that you might be shying away from behaving like human beings. And that can be dangerous for the country: that can ruin the lives of thousands of medicos and potentially make you inhumanely corrupt. 

If you really don’t know how to help the beleaguered students at a particular medical college today, you can always consult with all the stakeholders. That does not demean you, at least so far as we can see. 

Now let’s come to the business. You are there to regulate the institutions related to medical practice and medical education in Nepal. And the very people you are supposed to regulate need not regulate what you do/say or what you avoid/ignore. Wise ones understand more from less words and I need not open the can of worms that the medical education sector in Nepal is.

I am no authority to dictate anything to anybody other than myself. While my misdeeds risk blighting my future, your misdeeds risk blighting the future of the whole fraternity; that is the difference I want you to keep in mind.

A simple anecdote to elucidate the danger in front of you: whenever you travel in public vehicle, you must have heard people talking about the political leaders with contempt, hatred, mistrust, disdain and outright hostility. The same fate will befall upon you if you do not remain alert and jump into action at the moments like this.  

Your well-wisher
Dr. Jiwan Kshetry, Kathmandu

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