Saturday, October 26, 2013

A Good Bye to first innings

Swimming is all that easy but not crossing the river!!
Declaring an interlude


To me writing is fun (getting repeated rejections from publishers is not all that fun, though).

In two years of active writing and quasi-journalism, I have seen a lot and written a lot but I have really no clue how relevant part or whole of that has been.

Writing online has many plus points, one of them being the fact that number of my readers in US is nearly equal to those in Nepal and for every pageview from Nepal, there are three from abroad.


The most precious of all, this blog has helped me connect with some people with whom I was least likely to interact otherwise. This includes all the authors with their names in Guest column plus Noam Chomsky whom I interviewed through email but had to disguise it while publishing because he wished so.

Isn't that all fantastic?

It seems. But so far writing hasn't done one thing to me: it hasn't fed me. So, I have to do something else to feed so that I can survive and write, of course.

There lies the crux of the problem.

Am I going to stop writing to focus on feeding me? Sort of, for the time being. 



To give my academic course its due time, I have decided not to write henceforth unless I feel it is impossible not to write.

Hence my regular writing as a 'student' comes to an end.

But day follows every night. Eight months from now, if everything goes as planned, I will come out as a professional and not a student (a rather sorry state for someone who has called him a student for 2.5 decades!).

And for that professional life, I have some good plans about writing.

That is for later. In the meantime, I'll keep editing contributions from guests and posting them. Hopefully, they will contribute regularly enough not to disappoint my reader traffic, particularly at the weekends.

In a sense, my first innings as the 'student' active writer and blogger is about to come to an end. What comes after eight months will be a professional doing writing and blogging; the second innings for me.

And, by the way, my articles so far published in international outlets were the result of my endless experiments that I did with this blog.

If someone is naive enough to believe that I have some craft of writing, it is the result of my endless experiments with the words in this blog.

Words are not enough to express gratitude to a patient and committed readership that I have enjoyed all along the first innings. They have stuck to me despite all sorts of bizarre experiments I have been doing with words all along.

And my profound gratitude to all the guest contributors who have broken the monotony of my writing in the blog. Along with time tested contributors like Jeremy R Hammond, Ramzy Baroud and Maung Zarny, I have recently been privileged to find esteemed new contributors like Ali Malik and Nauman Sadiq.

The contributors of my special issues like Chaitanya Mishra, Avaya Shrestha, Saguna Shah, Prakash Lamichhane, Indra Dhoj Kshetri, Subhas Lamichhane and Aqeel Abbas deserve equal gratitude. Other occasional contributors have included LB Chhetri, Suruwat Lokendra K C, Sanjiwan Pradhan and Devi Prasad Tiwari and they have given a much needed diverse flavor to the readers.

Thanking you all, I declare my renewed affection to so-far-neglected part of studying for the academic course; it would be immense injustice not to study for eight months before final exams. After all, it is the degree from that academic course that will feed me; I can't fathom my writing and blogging will ever feed me twice a day!

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जीवन, खुशी अहंकार

जीवनमा अफ्ठ्यारा घुम्तीहरुमा हिंडिरहँदा मैले कुनै क्षणमा पलायनलाई एउटा विकल्पको रुपमा कल्पना गरेको थिएँ, त्यसलाई यथार्थमा बदल्ने आँट गरिनँ, त्यो बेग्लै कुरा हो त्यसबेला लाग्थ्योः मेरा समग्र दुखहरुको कारण मेरो वरपरको वातावरण हो, यसबाट साहसपूर्वक बाहिरिएँ भने नयाँ दुख आउलान् तर तत्क्षणका दुरुह दुखहरु गायब भएर जानेछन् कति गलत थिएँ !


Read more from Dashain Issue

Debating partition of India: culpability and consequences




Read the whole story here

Why I write...

I do not know why I often tend to view people rather grimly: they usually are not as benevolent, well-intentioned and capable or strong as they appear to be. This assumption is founded on my own self-assessment, though I don’t have a clue as to whether it is justifiable to generalize an observation made in one individual. This being the fact, my views of writers as ‘capable’ people are not that encouraging: I tend to see them as people who intend to create really great and world-changing writings but most of the times end up producing parochial pieces. Also, given the fact that the society where we grow and learn is full of dishonesty, treachery, deceit and above else, mundanity, it is rather unrealistic to expect an entirely reinvigorating work of writing from every other person who scribbles words in paper.


On life's challenges

Somebody has said: “I was born intelligent but education ruined me”. I was born a mere child, as everyone is, and grew up as an ordinary teenager eventually landing up in youth and then adulthood. The extent to which formal education helped me to learn about the world may be debatable but it definitely did not ruin me. There were, however, things that nearly ruined me. There came moments when I contemplated some difficult choices. And there came and passed periods when I underwent through an apparently everlasting spell of agony. There came bends in life from which it was very tempting to move straight ahead instead of following the zigzag course.


Read more