Monday, September 23, 2013

Oh lord! Save me from my friends


While the militants in Pakistan have apparently attributed the attacks as 'retaliation to drone attacks by US', either an insane or a brain dead will buy their argument: neither were the poor people in Pakistan behind any of the droning done by Nobel War Prize winner Barack Obama, nor will this butchery make any future droning less frequent or less lethal. Any religion in the world will say that butchering unarmed and vulnerable civilians is cowardice, pure and simple. 




Somebody has said somewhere: god, I can take care of my enemies, please save me from my friends.

While my esteemed friends need not be afraid of what I may say now, this saying perfectly captures the doldrums of many world capitals today.

Hypocrisy: CNN gleefully covers both the US's terror-breeding wars and their deadly consequences
At least 80 people have been killed in Pakistan in a deadly terrorist attack on a church. Meanwhile the bloody hostage crisis in Kenyan capital has taken its toll to at least 62 as more than 175 people are reported injured. Also, the drone attacks by the US keep indiscriminately killing people, from Pakistan to Yemen.

While the militants in Pakistan have apparently attributed the attacks as 'retaliation to drone attacks by US', either an insane or a brain dead will buy their argument: neither were the poor people in Pakistan behind any of the droning done by Nobel War Prize (forgive me if it is still called Peace Prize) winner Barack Obama, nor will this butchery make any future droning less frequent or less lethal. Any religion in the world will say that butchering unarmed and vulnerable civilians is cowardice, pure and simple.

What the perpetrators of this horrible crime try to conveniently forget (as does the NWP winner Obama) is that their birth and growth in hinterlands of Pakistan and Afghanistan had been possible only because they had the needed nourishment from their maternal state of Saudi Arabia and also because of close supervision and cooperation of the paternal state of United States. The same duo of states is now nurturing terror in Syria while indiscriminately droning people from Yemen to Pakistan. By blowing up innocent Pakistanis while their counterparts in Syria are waiting for the US to clear their way to Damascus, the Pakistani Taliban is closely following the footsteps of its purported adversary, the US; both use a deadly mix of hypocrisy and brutality.

Even though the Russia-led deal in Syria has avoided the immediate risk of total transformation of al-Qaeda into al-CIAda as suggested by many commentators, the brazen use of lethal force by the US in any part of the world has led to a situation in which the role of US can be traced, with robust idea of recent history of the world, in most such attacks. And the tragedy in Kenya is no exception.

Once terror is nurtured and terrorist organizations are made capable of unleashing lethal damage to any state or non-state actor, only one sequel is possible: they will proliferate and multiply over time and space. The US and allies wishfully thought that the Taliban would vanish in thin year after forcing the Russians to flee Afghanistan but that was that, mere wishful thinking. Nothing ever happens in this world just because we think or wish or do both. Nothing was done to defuse the ticking bomb, rather the Pakistani army went on nurturing the Taliban elements as the 'strategic asset' in its utterly myopic conduct.


The result: no geographical part of the world with probable exception of Antarctica can today boast of having no risk of any terrorist attack. Africa is no heaven of good governance and strong state apparatuses:  potential recruits there are just too many compared to what the terrorists can actually recruit.

I need not say any further as to how the thread of terror in Kenya today can be linked to the general business of breeding terrorists to punish the enemies. If I were to identify the central culprit for the devastation brought about by terrorist attacks like these, I would straightly go for the two parents of terror I have mentioned above.

The tragedy is, while the Taliban and al Shabab are perennially named as enemies of the people and the states, their very parents are 'friends' of both the people and the states in most parts of the world. While it may be possible to deal with the enemies in either case, it is insurmountably difficult to do so with the friends: today any state which honestly points to the US or Saudi as the root causes of terror risks either being bombed or droned. Even more ominously, an avalanche of al Qaeda fighters may be commissioned to teach such 'rogue elements' the proper lessons.

It indeed is difficult to deal with the friends. Oh lord! Save me from my friends.   

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जीवन, खुशी अहंकार

जीवनमा अफ्ठ्यारा घुम्तीहरुमा हिंडिरहँदा मैले कुनै क्षणमा पलायनलाई एउटा विकल्पको रुपमा कल्पना गरेको थिएँ, त्यसलाई यथार्थमा बदल्ने आँट गरिनँ, त्यो बेग्लै कुरा हो त्यसबेला लाग्थ्योः मेरा समग्र दुखहरुको कारण मेरो वरपरको वातावरण हो, यसबाट साहसपूर्वक बाहिरिएँ भने नयाँ दुख आउलान् तर तत्क्षणका दुरुह दुखहरु गायब भएर जानेछन् कति गलत थिएँ !


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